Columns

The Graphic Principle #0: Beginnings

Graphic Principle[3433]

Michael Tennant868cd4ff4e301dd085fd007d0108bb28

~ by Michael Tennant, the CBU’s Nightwing ~

Michael tends to be a conscientious thinker when it comes to all things comics. If you’ve been enjoying our brand spankin’ new website this past week then chances are you’ve come across one of his commentaries. Now the CBU is proud to finally announce his op-ed column, The Graphic Principle. The first proper entry is coming soon, but what follows is an introduction and preview of what to expect from Michael and TGP.


One day you see a comic. Just the cover at first. Something draws you to it. You reach out and look inside…

And a new world opens up. Stark images and bright colors. Heroes punching villains. Simple joy. All that you need when you are young and exploring new vistas.

As time passes you discover there are depths to these stories. It is not just the stories but how they are told. Wish fulfillment. Morality plays. Satire. They bridge the distance between how the world is and how we wish it could be. Not simply prose but also the art that brings distant universes to life.

This is what the Graphic Principle is all about.

Standing in these worlds that Jack and Will built. Standing on the shoulders of those before us. Marveling at the works of Ditko and Steranko and Kubert and so many others. In many different ways they made us think. Made us feel. Made us.

I still miss the friends I made in those pages. I reveled in their triumphs and mourned their losses. That is the wonder of comics, my friends.

As I try to make my own way as a writer and an artist, I will explore the hows and whys of this wonderful art form. This obsession.

I hope I am not alone.

(Jack is of course Kirby, Will is Eisner. Steve Ditko, Jim Steranko and Joe Kubert are the rest…there may be a test later!)


Author Info: After discovering Superboy and the Legion of Superheroes #239 as a young man, Michael never looked back. Armed with a passion for journalism and a thirst for knowledge, he still talks to his imaginary friends.

Categories: Columns, The Graphic Principle

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